dyatica:

Well connected, highly visible bicycle network. Vancouver, British Columbia.

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/5.6
  3. Exposure: 1/1000th
  4. Focal Length: 40mm

mikemeisenbach:

Denny Park Tower and Development Project, Seattle

Vulcan Real Estate has proposed a development plan for a mixed use development project including a new tall building/tower adjacent to Denny Park in Seattle.

The new project is proposed in either a mixed-use or all-commercial scenario. The mixed-use version would offer 420K squ. feet office space in a 240-ft-tall building, 460K squ. feet of residential space in a 400-ft-tall tower, 30K squ. feet of street-level retail commercial space along Westlake and Denny Avenues, and about 800 underground parking spaces.

image

I’m imagining the mixed-use development option is the one that is more likely to gain approval, since it’s generally less-preferred among municipal governments to unilaterally push commercial growth without also attempting to increase residential options. Some city planners are learning from cities like San Francisco, where the rising prices have steadily edged lower-income families out of affordable housing — resulting in some degree of backlash and protests.

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thislandisparkland:

Vancouver Brings the Park into the Street
It’s exciting to see cities taking the idea of the ‘park’ and extending that into the street. As cities get more and more built up and land for new parks is difficult to find, we are going to have to leverage the public space of our streets and redesign them to do more than just move cars.
Vancouver’s Comox-Helmcken Greenway, which connects the West End and English Bay to the Hornby separated bike lanes, is a great example of turning a street into a place to linger, rather than just move through. The next phase extends it into Yaletown.
The idea is to take a relatively low traffic volume street and enhance it for cycling and walking, bringing a park-like experience to a street while also connecting many green spaces together.
To do that, the City has not only put in some separated bike lanes where needed, but they have installed street furniture like tables and chairs at different spots along the way and created small rain gardens and other street gardens to bring more greenery into the street and help with storm water management.
From the signs I saw on some of the new little gardens, they are maintained by nearby neighbours. (The white picket fence garden has a message from “Michael” asking people not to pick the flowers.) New bulb outs on the street slow down cars further and help pedestrians cross the street by narrowing the width they have to walk.
During my week long stay in Vancouver, I found myself drawn back again and again to the street. It is an incredibly pleasant experience to ride your bike or stroll along it. Despite the fact that it is still a street, it does have the feeling of a linear park.
thislandisparkland:

Vancouver Brings the Park into the Street
It’s exciting to see cities taking the idea of the ‘park’ and extending that into the street. As cities get more and more built up and land for new parks is difficult to find, we are going to have to leverage the public space of our streets and redesign them to do more than just move cars.
Vancouver’s Comox-Helmcken Greenway, which connects the West End and English Bay to the Hornby separated bike lanes, is a great example of turning a street into a place to linger, rather than just move through. The next phase extends it into Yaletown.
The idea is to take a relatively low traffic volume street and enhance it for cycling and walking, bringing a park-like experience to a street while also connecting many green spaces together.
To do that, the City has not only put in some separated bike lanes where needed, but they have installed street furniture like tables and chairs at different spots along the way and created small rain gardens and other street gardens to bring more greenery into the street and help with storm water management.
From the signs I saw on some of the new little gardens, they are maintained by nearby neighbours. (The white picket fence garden has a message from “Michael” asking people not to pick the flowers.) New bulb outs on the street slow down cars further and help pedestrians cross the street by narrowing the width they have to walk.
During my week long stay in Vancouver, I found myself drawn back again and again to the street. It is an incredibly pleasant experience to ride your bike or stroll along it. Despite the fact that it is still a street, it does have the feeling of a linear park.
thislandisparkland:

Vancouver Brings the Park into the Street
It’s exciting to see cities taking the idea of the ‘park’ and extending that into the street. As cities get more and more built up and land for new parks is difficult to find, we are going to have to leverage the public space of our streets and redesign them to do more than just move cars.
Vancouver’s Comox-Helmcken Greenway, which connects the West End and English Bay to the Hornby separated bike lanes, is a great example of turning a street into a place to linger, rather than just move through. The next phase extends it into Yaletown.
The idea is to take a relatively low traffic volume street and enhance it for cycling and walking, bringing a park-like experience to a street while also connecting many green spaces together.
To do that, the City has not only put in some separated bike lanes where needed, but they have installed street furniture like tables and chairs at different spots along the way and created small rain gardens and other street gardens to bring more greenery into the street and help with storm water management.
From the signs I saw on some of the new little gardens, they are maintained by nearby neighbours. (The white picket fence garden has a message from “Michael” asking people not to pick the flowers.) New bulb outs on the street slow down cars further and help pedestrians cross the street by narrowing the width they have to walk.
During my week long stay in Vancouver, I found myself drawn back again and again to the street. It is an incredibly pleasant experience to ride your bike or stroll along it. Despite the fact that it is still a street, it does have the feeling of a linear park.

thislandisparkland:

Vancouver Brings the Park into the Street

It’s exciting to see cities taking the idea of the ‘park’ and extending that into the street. As cities get more and more built up and land for new parks is difficult to find, we are going to have to leverage the public space of our streets and redesign them to do more than just move cars.

Vancouver’s Comox-Helmcken Greenway, which connects the West End and English Bay to the Hornby separated bike lanes, is a great example of turning a street into a place to linger, rather than just move through. The next phase extends it into Yaletown.

The idea is to take a relatively low traffic volume street and enhance it for cycling and walking, bringing a park-like experience to a street while also connecting many green spaces together.

To do that, the City has not only put in some separated bike lanes where needed, but they have installed street furniture like tables and chairs at different spots along the way and created small rain gardens and other street gardens to bring more greenery into the street and help with storm water management.

From the signs I saw on some of the new little gardens, they are maintained by nearby neighbours. (The white picket fence garden has a message from “Michael” asking people not to pick the flowers.) New bulb outs on the street slow down cars further and help pedestrians cross the street by narrowing the width they have to walk.

During my week long stay in Vancouver, I found myself drawn back again and again to the street. It is an incredibly pleasant experience to ride your bike or stroll along it. Despite the fact that it is still a street, it does have the feeling of a linear park.

"Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else."
— Italo Calvino (via kamigami)

landscape-a-design:

Streetfilms

Walkable sububia - would have loved to do this

"

Mr. de Blasio’s move has set off a frenzy of not-in-my-backyard-park activism. Opponents have sued, arguing that affordable units by definition don’t fit the 2006 plan because they don’t contribute revenues to the park. Many say that they don’t oppose affordable housing, they just want it somewhere else.

Thankfully, many of their neighbors in Brooklyn see through those arguments. They recognize that raising a ruckus about “crowding,” property values, traffic and school capacity is just a less obvious way to try to keep poor, or poorer, people off your block, and out of your park. The following statements are true, and not incompatible: Private development is essential to Brooklyn Bridge Park’s success. But a lack of affordable housing is a citywide emergency. Brooklyn Bridge Park can sustain itself through its public-private model and still have some affordable units built on its edges. The Brooklyn waterfront can and should stay green without becoming a luxury enclave, because this city gem is nobody’s private backyard.

"

jeromebenhur:

Thinking on the lake side redevelopment, regrouping the amorphous developments. Sketching iso of our ideas sometimes helps a lot to bring out neatness. Anyway I am working on options. :)

  1. Camera: Canon CanoScan LiDE 25

landscape-a-design:

Landscape Architecture Network

conceptsketch:

project name: catch the views house 
architects: LAND arquitectos (cristobal valenzuela h. + angela delorenzo a.)
contributors: javier lorenzo, gonzalo arteche , francisco duarte, andrés altamirano

via

stadium-love-:

Joe Spear, Populous’ lead designer for Oriole Park at Camden Yards, spoke with Eric Angevine about the role Eutaw Street and the B&O Warehouse play in making Camden Yards one of baseball’s most beloved ballparks.

As a designer, the thing I really like is the tension between the warehouse building and the ballpark itself. And what I mean by that is the Eutaw street corridor. Eutaw was a street that used to run through that neighborhood, and holding that apart from the ballpark creates a sort of tension; they’re two separate things that don’t touch.  

We also went for a scale shift in the detail. We looked at the warehouse to inform but not dictate the design of the ballpark itself. 

The ballpark itself is a big building on the landscape of Baltimore, so for us the scale shift between small windows that are five feet tall on the warehouse and 45 feet tall on the ballpark was really a pretty successful thing. And it helped us put the ballpark in the middle of downtown Baltimore in a way that kind of mitigated the scale of it all. If it were just that one baseball building standing there, I don’t think it would have been nearly as successful without the warehouse to work against. 

Read the full article here | Photo by Bdinphoenix

newsweek:

We’ve decided to look deeper at the matter by exploring average internet speeds by state with this map. Using Akamai’s “State of the Internet” Report, we were able to find the average internet speed in each state.

The speeds are measured in megabits per second (mbps) which is simply a measurement of data transfer speed within a network. In our map, darker greens represent faster speeds and lighter greens represent slower speeds.

The Northeast has some of the fastest speeds in the nation, while the Midwest and less populated states have generally slower speeds. The state with the fastest speed was Virginia at 13.7 average mbps, while the slowest belonged to Alaska at 7 average mbps. Check out our map and see where your state ranks!

Internet Speeds by State: MAP - Broadview OfficeSuite Blog

think-progress:

Ford is planning to build a solar canopy covering 360 parking spaces at their world headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan near Detroit.

condenasttraveler:

Perfectly pink house and bicycle on Mackinac Island in Michigan. #myweekendescape from @deblontoh. Thanks for tagging! #michigan #mackinacisland