thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax.  
Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there. thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax.  
Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there. thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax.  
Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there. thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax.  
Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there.

thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax. 

Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there.

imaginingcities:

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighbourhoods and support high-quality transit.

You can find the document here.

(Source: alexinsd)

maptitude1:

An illustrated world map.

huntingtonlibrary:

Since it’s a bajillion degrees out today here at The Huntington, here’s a virtual trip outside to walk along the phases of the moon in our Children’s Garden. When the temps drop off a bit, you’ll have to come moonwalk for real.

huntingtonlibrary:

Since it’s a bajillion degrees out today here at The Huntington, here’s a virtual trip outside to walk along the phases of the moon in our Children’s Garden. When the temps drop off a bit, you’ll have to come moonwalk for real.

thisbigcity:

Send us your best urbanism #didyouknow, and we just might include it in this series!

Fact Source | Image Source

zpfutterer:

I started talking with a street artist on the river bank who had been chalking this drawing for over two hours. When I asked him what led him to do it, he said that it relaxes him and that he likes how it sparks different opinions. #berges #placemaking #paris

ausonia:

What modern Mecca looks like

urbanfunscape:

With Love From Pittsburgh

image

newsweek:

“Enter Pyongyang” is another stunning collaboration between city-­branding pioneer JT Singh and flow-motion videographer Rob Whitworth. Blending time-lapse photography, acceleration and slow motion, HD and digital animation, they have produced a cutting‐edge panorama of a city hardly known, but one emerging on the visitor’s landscape as North Korea’s opening unfolds.

North Korea was the last country seemingly immune to change—but no longer. Recent years have witnessed mobile phone penetration, a surge in tourists, and even a marathon. Numerous special economic zones have been launched in cooperation with China, Russia, and South Korea, with railways planned linking all countries in the region. “Enter Pyongyang” captures not just the city, but this dynamism and sense of potential.

This video is the single most significant multi-­media contribution to transcending clichés about North Korea as a society defined by reclusiveness and destitution. To travel there is to witness a proud civilization, though one caught in a Cold War time-warp. Korean cultural traditions are meticulously preserved and displayed in authentic richness. Anyone who has witnessed the awe-inspiring Mass Games knows that, with great sacrifice, North Koreans can pull off a performance unparalleled in its precision.

(Source: vimeo.com)

mikemeisenbach:

Project proposal documents for a mixed-use development adjacent to Denny Park in Seattle. Documents by Vulcan, ZGF Architects, and Ankrom Moisan Architects.

mikemeisenbach:

Whenever a public space redesign is proposed, like that of Waterfront Seattle, it brings out a lot of armchair critics and naysayers. Rarely do any of these people focus on the myriad of positive details about such products — instead, they’ll often hyper-focus on a handful of details that are only a part of the overall vision, or things which would certainly be adjusted and improved prior to the final design execution.

So it is with "Waterfront park needs a dose of reality”, where the main criticism seems to be focused upon how the designers’ concept drawings were illustrated in too-positive a manner. Apparently, the critic was displeased that the illustrations weren’t representative of rainy days, unhappy people, and a depiction of some theoretical dystopian future where the park was run-down, polluted and ill-maintained. I have yet to see examples of where architectural designers and urban planners purposefully drew up illustrations in a way that would totally undermine any reasons for going forward with a project!

Likewise, in “The waxing and waning of Seattle’s waterfront plan”, the writer criticizes some of the artistic elements of the newly updated design, suggesting that misty rocks were unnecessary since Seattle already has plenty of that — and they criticize a park segment that contains lots of plants for interrupting the view and, well, for having lots of plants!

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